Image

Age and Image

Bobby Fischer

Bobby Fischer

Bobby Fischer was a teenager when he became the U.S. Chess Champion. Almost all the international grandmasters were in their twenties and thirties when they reached the apex of their careers. What does this mean for YOU and your image?

A study of “The Age Factor in Master Chess” by Ernest Rubin, published in The American Statistician (1960) found an “extremely significant” difference between young and older players in terms of skill and chess mastery.

There is a similar correlation between success in sports and age. The author of the above-mentioned study found that “few athletes in baseball, basketball, football, soccer, boxing or track, to mention a few sports, reach their fortieth birthday on the active list.”

Having co-written a recent book on hormones — The New Testosterone Treatment (2013) — it is obvious to me that the reason for the diminution in sports and chess skill with age is due to the well-known decline in hormones that occurs with increasing age.

What does this have to do with your image? Well, really everything! As you age into your late thirties and forties and beyond, your hormone levels typically decline. Testosterone, estrogen, DHEA, pregnenolone and other hormone levels decline in almost all people, with increasing diminution in cognitive, mental, and physical strength. There is only so much that can be accomplished by cosmetic enhancements, such as changing wardrobe, footwear, and hairstyles. In many cases supplementing with hormones can increase mental and physical strength and bring a client new youthfulness.

For this reason we are able to refer interested clients to anti-aging doctors who can help them safely achieve teenage hormones levels. Such clients can expect to see dramatic improvements in their mood, endurance, and consequently in their image. Others will perceive them as being more alert and youthful.

The fear that hormone replacement is harmful or carcinogenic is unfounded when one uses natural bioidentical hormone replacement therapy.

While not all clients wish to pursue this option, those in the know will at least consider the suggestion and will investigate our advice to consider this as one of many methods to improve their image after the age of forty.

References
Friedman, Edward, with William Cane (2013). The New Testosterone Treatment: How You and Your Doctor Can Fight Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer and Alzheimers. (Prometheus Books).

Rubin, E. (1960). The Age Factor in Master Chess. The American Statistician, 14, 19-21.

By |April 5th, 2014|Image|0 Comments

Phone Face and How You Can Avoid It

cell phone and breast cancer

Cell phone caused breast cancer

They talk on the phone all day long and never suspect that it may be affecting their image. In fact, the younger a person is the more likely they will be carrying a cell phone all day long. But what effect does this have on their image? And should bankers, lawyers, accountants and artists carry a cell phone with them and talk on it when in public? Does it affect their image?

To answer these questions, we polled 12 executives who were the owners of companies or in a management position. They had a median age of 52 and were able to decide on the fate of people they might hire. In other words, they’re the kind of people whose opinion matters when it comes to your next place of employment. They told us that in their opinion cell phone face is something to be avoided at all costs.

Forty percent of the managers said a cell phone was a distraction. Fifty-two percent said that a cell phone was a sign of an unfocused mind. And 80 percent said they would be less likely to hire someone who had a visible cell phone with them during an interview.

One of the managers referred to what he called “cell phone face.” It’s that ever-present look you get when you carry a cell phone with you all the time and bury your face in it even when in public. “It reflects a distasteful fluorescent glow up onto the person’s skin, making them look green and sick.” he added. “It also makes them look disinterested in what is going on around them.”

Another executive told us that if a person comes into an interview with a cell phone in his or her hand, he stops the interview right then and there and tells them to either shut it and put it away or consider the interview ended.

CELL PHONE FACE

The problem with cell phone face is that most young people don’t know they suffer from this condition. In other words, they show up at events with their cell phone blazing, and a sickly green glow reflecting up onto their face. “It’s like they’re in a horror movie, or sick,” said one female executive in a law office. “I don’t think they know it, but they look like they’re in another world. It’s certainly not an inviting image.”

As image consultants, we realize that people want to stay in touch and that young people, especially, feel a need to be on their cell phones 24/7. However, it’s our responsibility to report that in many cases the very cell phone which they think is keeping them in touch is actually destroying their chances for advancing their careers.

“I don’t hire people who arrive at an interview with a cell phone in their hand,” says a senior-level manager at a New York restaurant. “I have found that they may be more focused on talking and chatting with their friends than on doing their job. That, to me, is a real turn-off, and I have never hired a person like that.”

CANCER AND CELL PHONES

Another problem with constant cell phone use is the real possibility that the microwaves it emits will cause cancer. In the photo at the head of this article you can see a girl who  carried her cell phone in her bra. She did this for 12 years and then noticed a lump, which grew bigger. She was diagnosed with breast cancer. Naturally she was devastated, and she thought she might die. She elected to have a mastectomy, surgical removal of her left breast. Her name is Tiffany Frantz and she is brave enough to warn others that there is a real danger here.

For those unsure about the risks, we recommend the book Cell Phones: Invisible Hazards in the Wireless Age: An Insider’s Alarming Discoveries about Cancer and Genetic Damage by Dr. George Carlo and Martin Schram.

Our final point, as image consultants, is that carrying a cell phone does not make you look cute or connected. Our research demonstrates that it makes you look untrustworthy and distracted, and it impedes your chances for success with decision-makers.

By |December 27th, 2013|Image|1 Comment

Mastering Speed Reading for Your Image

Mastering Speed Reading

The best speed reading book ever written. Short. Sweet. Easy to Use.

I learned speed reading and read War and Peace in 32 minutes. It’s about Russia.

Sure, this is a funny joke. But does speed reading really diminish comprehension?

Not at all! If done properly, it can actually increase your comprehension. And there’s no better book to teach this skill than Norman Maberly’s Mastering Speed Reading. I read it in high school and was able to read a book a day. By the time I graduated I had read Nietzsche, Tolstory, Sartre, Kierkegaard, Camus, and hundreds of other great authors.

SPEED READING AND YOUR IMAGE

But what does speed reading have to do with your image?

The life of Jackie Kennedy suggests that the answer to this question is “Quite a lot.”

Before she met John F. Kennedy, Jackie was a photojournalist for the Washington Times-Herald newspaper. Her column was “The Inquiring Camera Girl.” She used to take pictures of people and ask them a question and write a column about them.

She was a great reader, and as a result, a wonderful conversationalist. At parties, she could talk about art, painting, literature, or anything under the sun. When she met Senator Kennedy, she caught his attention not only because she was a vivacious young woman, but also because her mind was sparkling with a hundred different topics that she could talk about. As a politician, it was natural for John to have multiple interests. The fact that Jackie could keep up with him in conversations — largely because of her wide reading — fueled their mutual attraction.

If you learn speed reading you’ll be able to read widely. You’ll never be at a loss for something to talk about. When people meet you, your demeanor is part of your image. A person who can talk about many topics usually has a welcoming demeanor because they can talk about anything. So, in this way, by opening your horizons to many different topics, you will improve your image in the eyes of other people.

JACKIE KENNEDY AS A YOUNG WOMAN

Jackie Kennedy was a firstborn with a sister, Lee Radziwill, four and a half years her junior. The future First Lady’s undergraduate degree was in French literature. Upon graduation from college, she became engaged for three months to a stockbroker, John G. W. Husted, Jr. She also took a few graduate classes at Georgetown University, in Washington, D.C.

Jackie Kennedy at Doubleday

Jackie was a booklover. Here she is at Doubleday.

Shortly after she met Kennedy, she featured him in one of her newspaper columns. She also helped him run for public office, and after they got married and JFK was elected president, Jackie became one of the most well-known women in the world. After her husband’s assassination in 1963, and the assassination of her brother-in-law Robert F. Kennedy in 1968, Jackie feared that the Kennedy’s were targets, and she felt that her children might be in danger. So she decided to leave the country, and she married Aristotle Onassis, a Greek billionaire who was in the shipping business. They lived in Greece and spent a good deal of time on his $32 million yacht, the Christina O. Named after Onassis’s daughter, the ship has 18 luxury staterooms.

LATER IN LIFE

After Aristotle Onassis died in 1975, Jackie moved back to New York and worked as an editor at Doubleday. She secured this job because she was a friend of John Sargent, president and CEO of the publishing house. In effect, she worked as an executive assistant to Sargent, with fairly light editorial responsibilities. As a socialite, she was frequently in the company of men in high authority. For example, when she returned to New York, she became the companion of Maurice Tempelsman, chairman of Lazare Kaplan International Inc., the largest diamond company in the U.S.

In later years, Jackie often dyed her hair black. It is believed that this contributed to her developing the disease that killed her, non-Hodgkins lymphoma.

 

By |September 26th, 2013|Image|0 Comments